Greening the Rust Belt

Urban Resilience

Urban resilience understands people and nature as linked and equated players in socio-ecological systems. Urban resilience assumes that the complex socio-ecological systems of cities, like those in New York's Rust Belt, are in fact always in flux and subject to change and disturbance. When faced with lesser or greater degrees of disturbance, the measure of a their resilience is found in their capacity to innovate and use their available assets, to subsequently renew and rebuild themselves.

As a subject, urban resilience is on the vanguard of contemporary theory and practice and ecologists including Steward T.A. Pickett and C. A. Holling argue for improving the integration of ecology, social science and planning to foster urban resilience and help cities adapt in the context of change. The most effective help will come by working together across disciplines and knowledge arenas and by bringing designers, ecologists, sociologists, economists, policy makers and community partners together to problem-solve and to improve the capacity of cities to “bounce back,” adjust and adapt while maintaining their core ecological and social functions, identity and quality of life.

How Resilient is your City
or Community?

Urban resilience assumes that the complex socio-ecological systems of cities, like those in New York's Rust Belt, are in fact always in flux and subject to change and disturbance. When faced with lesser or greater degrees of disturbance, the measure of a their resilience is found in their capacity to innovate and use their available assets, to subsequently renew and rebuild themselves.